HE39 | Rosemary Oil

he39.jpg
Rosemary.jpg
he39.jpg
Rosemary.jpg

HE39 | Rosemary Oil

34.19
Quantity:
Add To Cart

~ Rosmarinus Officinalis ~

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant evergreen needle-like leaves. It is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, which also includes many other herbs. The name rosemary derives from the Latin name rosmarinus, which is from dew (ros) and sea (marinus), or dew of the sea


Uses:

Traditional use:
Rosemary has a very old reputation for improving memory, and has been used as a symbol for remembrance (during weddings, war commemorations and funerals) in Europe and Australia. Mourners would throw it into graves as a symbol of remembrance for the dead. One modern study showed that when the smell of rosemary was pumped into cubicles where people were working, those people showed improved memory, though with slower recall.

Rosemary contains a number of potentially biologically active compounds, including antioxidants such as carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid. Other bioactive compounds include camphor (up to 20% in dry rosemary leaves), caffeic acid, ursolic acid, betulinic acid, rosmaridiphenol, and rosmanol.

Directions:
Use in oil burner: add a few drops to water. 
Possible skin irritant; Test on small area of skin and dilute if necessary, before use.
NOT TO BE TAKEN INTERNALLY

Production Method:
Extraction

Warnings:
A few instances of allergic skin reactions to topical preparations containing rosemary have been reported. Recent European research has shown that rosemary interferes with the absorption of iron in the diet, which indicates that it should not be used internally by persons with iron deficiency anemia.

Rosemary in culinary or therapeutic doses is generally safe. Toxicity studies of the plant on rats has shown hepatoprotective and antimutagenic activities, however, precaution is necessary for those displaying allergic reaction or prone to epileptic seizures. Rosemary essential oil may have epileptogenic properties, as a handful of case reports over the past century have linked its use with seizures in otherwise healthy adults or children.[12] Rosemary essential oil is potentially toxic if ingested.

Large quantities of rosemary leaves can cause adverse reactions, such as coma, spasm, vomiting, and pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs) that can be fatal. Avoid consuming large quantities of rosemary especially if pregnant or breastfeeding.